Birds of Edmonds, WA. 2020

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Photo-Techno Geek Speak

As I mentioned, I dropped my camera and my 100-400L II telephoto zoom is out of commission until I can get it to the camera shop. Since I would have gotten little or nothing in trade-in for my original 100-400L, I kept it as a back-up when I purchased its succcesor.

Although I believe my "new" 100-400L II is superior, the original model is still a very good lens. For those on a budget (and who isn't?) wanting to acquire a Canon L series telephoto lens, I have seen used ones offered at Kenmore Camera in the $400 range. That is a fraction of the price of a new series II.

I think a 400mm lens is the minimum necessary for wildlife photography and the 100-400L is perfect for the "walk & stalk" method I enjoy. In that range I prefer a zoom lens over a prime as it gives me greater flexibility in composing shots.

I should add that Kenmore Camera has a very good price on a used 600mm telephoto lens if anyone wants to "go large". The down side is that a heavy duty tripod and mount will cost about the the same if you don't already have them in your arsenal.
https://kenmorecamera.com/product/169985/used-canon-ef-600mm-f4-l-is
 
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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
I returned to the back deck in the afternoon to get some photos before it got too hot. My son dragged out the 600L telephoto lens + tripod for closer shots.

The Anna's hummer returned to her favorite perch.

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Bewick's wrens enjoy this spot as well as my back fence.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
The flicker spent time at the suet feeder without getting spooked.

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Chestnut-backed chickadees flew in after the flicker departed.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Friday morning (8-7-2020) three band-tailed pigeons from the flock that roosts in my neighbor tree finally visited my seed feeders. I took some grab shots through the glass as I knew they would take off as soon as I opened the door. Shots of only one bird were remotely in focus.

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The Anna's hummer stopped to drink at one of my feeders. I did not get any shots of her, but I probably will this winter when the feeder is her only source of food.
 

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Saturday evening (8-8-2020) the female Anna's hummingbird perched at one of the feeders on my back deck long enough for me to get a shot of her.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Wednesday (8-12-2020). More photos of the Anna's hummer. I have seen evidence that the rufous hummer is still in the area, such as two hummers chasing each other and one hummer strafing another.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Lots of birds have been visiting the suet feeder that hangs from my back shed.

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The pairs of birds that visited my feeders this spring have returned en force with their offspring this summer.
 

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
This morning I saw three hummers chasing each other around a far tree while I was eating breakfast. Two of them later ganged up to chase off a finch size bird.
 

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
This morning I saw three hummers chasing each other around a far tree while I was eating breakfast.
Ditto for Wednesday morning (8-19-2020). I'll try to set up early Thursday morning so I can photograph them with the 6ooL telephoto lens. In the meantime, here are some hummer photos from later in the day.

A female Anna's checking out a ground plant near the seed feeders.

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Looking into my back yard from a sentry tree in my neighbors' yard next to our shared fence.

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Feeding on my neighbor's flowers.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Various birds at the seed feeders.

Dark-eyed junco.

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Black-capped chickadee.

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I filled one feeder with a nut mix. I thought the nuts might be too large for the smaller birds, but the chickadee had no problem with the peanuts.

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I am guessing this is a fledgling male house finch that is starting to get its adult coloration.

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Yellow-breasted nuthatches continue to visit the hanging suet feeder.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
I was about to hang it up for the afternoon when a flock of bushtits flew in and briefly occupied the suet feeder.

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Last bird standing.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Thursday morning (8-20-2020) I heard a bird call that I could not ID but sounded familiar. It turned out to be that of a female hairy woodpecker. She could be one of the pair that nests in nearby Pine Ridge Park.

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Terry O

Well-Known Member
Nice to see, Bill. Haven’t seen one here lately. Lots of flicker families, but no Downies or Hairies.
 
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