Birds of Nebraska

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Tom Z

Member
You could make the case that not all the water that flows out of the Pacific Northwest goes to Pacific Ocean, some of the eastern water follows Lewis and Clark's path through Nebraska. That must be why I love the PNW so much. I have a nephew who lives in Oregon and on a trip to the Mount Rainier Scenic RR I fell in love with Washington State. Nebraska and the Missouri River Valley has a diverse population of birds and wildlife. Birds in particular. 200 miles west of Omaha is the Sandhill Crane flyway. In what I consider the Omaha area are 3 lakes that were formed at various times by changes in the Missouri River flow pattern. We call them Oxbow lakes, but north south bird traffic is quite a sight. Eagles stay around most of the year, Pelicans, Swans, Snow geese, Canada geese. Many species of ducks pass through in the spring and fall. There is also a network of creeks in eastern Ne with walking trails along side. Fox, Mink, Black Squirrels, Skunks which are fun to avoid on the bike trail in the dark, Deer, Woodchuck are common. Our city birds are Cardinals, Bluejay, Junco, Goldfinch, Purple Finch and you could spend hours classifying the different Sparrows. Here are some pics of eagle and Snow geese from the first part of this year and late 2017.

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BobH

Administrator
Staff member
Hello and welcome to the forum! I’m pretty sure you’re one of the folks from railroadforums, nice to see you visit this place as well. Looking forward to seeing some of your work, and tell your nephew I said hello.
 

BobH

Administrator
Staff member
My son was in Great Falls, MT for a few years and I was surprised to find the Missouri River there. I knew the water flowed east on that side, just didn’t realize how far west they called it the Missouri.
 

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Tom is a member of the Omaha Posse and has contributed numerous photos of trains in Nebraska to the railroad forum.

Welcome to this forum, Tom. Bob has a special section just for bird photography and the new format makes posting photos extremely easy. I am looking forward to photos of cardinals, which I miss after seeing them during my years in Chicagoland and southeast Missouri.
 

Tom Z

Member
You are correct Bob. One of my travel destinations is the area where the Missouri starts. I have dipped my toes in the Pacific Ocean and the headwaters of the Mississippi so Montana and Idaho are next. One of the goals for this summer is to get a really good Cardinal picture. I have to say the photographers on this forum have set the bar pretty high. There is some really super work here.
 

BobH

Administrator
Staff member
Cardinals are a bit of a sore point for me. I love them, such wonderful colors, really brightened up a winter day. They’re also quite common and very wide spread. Easy to find almost anywhere. Almost. For whatever reason, they avoid the Pacific Northwest. I have to make do with Stellars and Scrub Jays. Great birds in their own right, smart and spunky, but I miss my cardinals.
 

BobH

Administrator
Staff member
On a related note, quite possibly the oddest football team I’ve ever heard of is the Orting, WA Cardinals. WTH? Unless you’re a worm, cardinals probably don’t strike fear in your heart like lions and tigers and bears. Also, those kids have quite possibly never seen one, as we have none.
 

Tom Z

Member
I was encouraged by Bill to post some more pictures from Nebraska, since it's 2 years from this post. Here some of our local birds and some on their way somewhere else. Cormorants at Memphis (NE) State Recreation Area. Eagles in flooded area along interstate 29 in Iowa. Turkey Vultures just across the wide Missouri River in Iowa.

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Tom Z

Member
Sharp Shinned has taken residence in a large tree on my parents property. My wife and I think the last one is a Tufted Titmouse but is still up for debate.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
On a related note, quite possibly the oddest football team I’ve ever heard of is the Orting, WA Cardinals. WTH? Unless you’re a worm, cardinals probably don’t strike fear in your heart like lions and tigers and bears. Also, those kids have quite possibly never seen one, as we have none.
You are forgetting the Arizona nee St. Louis nee Chicago Cardinals. My favorite is the University of Louisville, whose mascot is a cardinal snarling and baring its teeth out the side of its mouth.
 
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Tom Z

Member
Last year around this time these guys were hanging around on the opposite bank of the recreational trail along the Papillion Creek. About 3 blocks from my house. They are not there this year. These vultures each have their own fence post.

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BobH

Administrator
Staff member
Tom, welcome back and great photos! Especially impressed with the eagle shots, you got some nice closeups.

As for the vultures... They regulars around your parts? You haven't developed a fever and cough, have you?
 

Tom Z

Member
I don’t know what magic you worked to get the pictures formatted that way but I like it. There are many turkey vultures around here. The other day while walking on the trail there was a group of approximately 2 dozen flying high above. Usually 3 or 4 staying close to roadkill along the highways. My wife and I only go out if absolutely needed. No sickness here although my wife’s allergies are acting up so coughing and sneezing is normal. A mask helps that too. Haven’t seen as many eagles as last year, but I think the mild winter and floods of last year have affected all the wildlife around here. The two eagles pictured above were feeding on a carcass of something killed by the floods. There was another 6 or 8 eagles farther away in that area but they have moved on as the water is receding. At the time those images were taken, March, there was still water 2 miles from the Missouri River.
 

BobH

Administrator
Staff member
I don’t know what magic you worked to get the pictures formatted that way but I like it. There are many turkey vultures around here. The other day while walking on the trail there was a group of approximately 2 dozen flying high above. Usually 3 or 4 staying close to roadkill along the highways. My wife and I only go out if absolutely needed. No sickness here although my wife’s allergies are acting up so coughing and sneezing is normal. A mask helps that too. Haven’t seen as many eagles as last year, but I think the mild winter and floods of last year have affected all the wildlife around here. The two eagles pictured above were feeding on a carcass of something killed by the floods. There was another 6 or 8 eagles farther away in that area but they have moved on as the water is receding. At the time those images were taken, March, there was still water 2 miles from the Missouri River.
When you upload files, it gives you the option to insert either thumbnails or full size images. I simply went back and changed your thumbnails to full size. It shows off the details much better. To be honest, I suspect most folks don't bother clicking on the thumbnails unless a photo really catches their eye. So I make it easy for everyone.
 
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