Old Train

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Cprowler

New Member
I took this last month in White Rock and was happy with it.

I remember when I originally signed up here there were some train people here. I have never really been one, my Brother in law and uncle are and my grandfather worked on them in Nelson up to the 50's. I have to say that after seeing this one in person it's starting rub off on me.


4415632813_bd515685ea.jpg
 

SteveF

New Member
Great Shot!

Well, I can certainly understand why it is rubbing off on you.

I suspect that this is not your first rodeo. That said, you managed to get all of the conventions right on your first shot.

1. The light is right. Too often, new railroad photogs will try to backlight the locomotive. It just doesn't work. I really like the way that you highlighted the firebox and the steam chest.

2. The rods are down. The convention is that the connecting rods must be in the lower half of the wheels. Yours are spot on. I don't know why this convention developed, but it has existed since Matthew Brady.

3. This is especially important for a steam engine, you must show that it is alive. There are many ways to do this, panning to blur the driving wheels, planning to blur the background, panning to blur the locomotive. This last one is seldom used. What you have done is to show the steam escaping from what I believe is safety valve.

I give you a 10/10. The East German judge is not so admiring of your work. She only gave you a 8.3. :D:D:D
 
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BobH

Administrator
Staff member
Nice shot, very well done. That's one of my favorite engines, Canadian Pacific Royal Hudson 2860. This engine is one of the streamlined Hudsons (4-6-4's). Her sister engine, 2850, hauled King George VI across Canada, and he was so impressed he granted CPR permission to call the class "Royal Hudsons". This was quite an honor.

For a long time that engine was an ambassador for the province of British Columbia, running between Vancouver and Squamish. The line is incredibly scenic, and unlike the majority of tourist trains, the engine was allowed to run at speeds of up to 40 mph or so, maybe more. (I don't know the exact speed limit imposed). It was a nice long trip on a mainline railroad, quite impressive and also very reasonably priced. It was, quite literally, one of the best tourist railway operations in the world.

Sadly, things changed when the engine was found to be in need of repairs, and for a while it was out of service. It's now back in operation, but only runs on special occasions. That's too bad, as it's a really nice locomotive.


...What you have done is to show the steam escaping from what I believe is safety valve.
I'm pretty certain the steam you see is from the steam dynamo, a small turbine used to generate electricity for the headlight and other electrical devices on the engine.

I remember when I originally signed up here there were some train people here.
Train fans? On this site? Hmm... Who would that be?
 

Cprowler

New Member
Thanks guys!


Well, I can certainly understand why it is rubbing off on you.

I suspect that this is not your first rodeo. That said, you managed to get all of the conventions right on your first shot.

1. The light is right. Too often, new railroad photogs will try to backlight the locomotive. It just doesn't work. I really like the way that you highlighted the firebox and the steam chest.

2. The rods are down. The convention is that the connecting rods must be in the lower half of the wheels. Yours are spot on. I don't know why this convention developed, but it has existed since Matthew Brady.

3. This is especially important for a steam engine, you must show that it is alive. There are many ways to do this, panning to blur the driving wheels, planning to blur the background, panning to blur the locomotive. This last one is seldom used. What you have done is to show the steam escaping from what I believe is safety valve.

I give you a 10/10. The East German judge is not so admiring of your work. She only gave you a 8.3. :D:D:D

Thanks Steve, but is was just shit house luck. :)

It was the golden hour just before sunset and that's just how it stoped with the rods. But I'm happy with it just the same. ;)


Nice shot, very well done. That's one of my favorite engines, Canadian Pacific Royal Hudson 2860. This engine is one of the streamlined Hudsons (4-6-4's). Her sister engine, 2850, hauled King George VI across Canada, and he was so impressed he granted CPR permission to call the class "Royal Hudsons". This was quite an honor.

For a long time that engine was an ambassador for the province of British Columbia, running between Vancouver and Squamish. The line is incredibly scenic, and unlike the majority of tourist trains, the engine was allowed to run at speeds of up to 40 mph or so, maybe more. (I don't know the exact speed limit imposed). It was a nice long trip on a mainline railroad, quite impressive and also very reasonably priced. It was, quite literally, one of the best tourist railway operations in the world.

Sadly, things changed when the engine was found to be in need of repairs, and for a while it was out of service. It's now back in operation, but only runs on special occasions. That's too bad, as it's a really nice locomotive.
Yes, I think you are right on all fronts. As I mentioned I'm not a train guy so I don't have anything to ad. :eek:

It came to town as part of the torch run ceremony a few days before the olympics.
 

JaniceL

Super Moderator
Staff member
I think that train is looking pretty happy. Is that a smile I see on the front of the engine?
 

BobH

Administrator
Staff member
Tony, that's a very old photo, we haven't run #5 in many years now...

You've also managed to stump me on the location, which isn't easy. I think it might be at Park Junction, but I can't really see enough to be certain, and things look a lot different there now.
 

Tony S

New Member
I wondered if you would notice it was from a while ago, one cold, clear December day if I remember correctly. At Park Junction about 100 yards in off the highway
 

SteveF

New Member
Cprowler, don't you love it when Serendipity happens? Whether $hithouse luck or well planned shot, it's a winner.

Do you suppose you could post a higher resolution shot, enough to make my Desktop background. This post fuzzes out.
 

BobH

Administrator
Staff member
Bob. yer prolly right about that steam dynamo. Like I said, I was just guessing... :D
Well, I've probably got an unfair advantage, as I spend quite a bit of time around steam locomotives.

Here's a shot on board the biggest engine I've ever run, SP&S 700. (Since it's the 3rd largest steam locomotive currently in operation, it will probably hold that title for a while.) Photo by Jim Abney

View attachment 2554
 
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