Wildlife of Edmonds, WA. 2018

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Bill Anderson

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It eventually came to the attention of a resident minion of the Dark Lord, which chased it across the marsh.

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Best photo, highly tweaked.

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I believe the merlin had captured a dragonfly, the wings of which are barely visible behind the merlin's rump and beneath its tail feathers.

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The merlin shot past us very close. The best I could manage were some retreating butt shots as it flew towards the marina. You can make out what I believe are the dragonfly's legs sticking out from under the merlin.

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Bill Anderson

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I had not set up my super telephoto package, so all of the above shots were taken with the 1Dx + 100-400L II telephoto zoom. Except for when the merlin was perched on the far tree, I doubt I could have followed it with the 500L telephoto + 2x III teleconverter.
 

Bill Anderson

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The official residence of the Consul General of the Republic of Korea is near the nest of the Pt. Edwards eagles. While photographing the eagles Thursday afternoon (10-4-18), I caught a male Anna's hummingbird hunting bugs near the ROK national flag, which is always flying at the residence. Both of my children are adoptees from South Korea, so the photos have a special meaning for me.

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Bill Anderson

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I do a quick scan of my close surroundings when I park at the marsh to make sure something is not perched on the nearby viewing platform or boardwalk. Saturday (10-6-18) afternoon I noticed something perched on the old martin gourd holder off the #2 (main) platform.

I initially thought it was one of the juvie Cooper's hawks that has been hanging around the marsh. Looking at my photos, I realized it was a female northern harrier.

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It stayed perched long enough for me to set up the super telephoto package of 5DIII + 500L telephoto lens + 2x teleconverter mounted on a tripod.

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The harrier looks like a cross between a hawk and an owl.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
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It took off......

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and made several harrier type patrols low over the marsh. Tracking it was easier with the 1Dx + 100-400L II telephoto zoom.

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I also saw two coyotes on the far side of the marsh, but my photos of them were not worth saving.

I see a harrier at the marsh once every year or two in the fall. I believe they are just passing through town on their way north , as I think the marsh is too small to support one over the winter. Somewhat surprising, harriers to not seem to draw the wrath of the crows like other raptors do.
 
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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
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I also saw my first of the season yellow-rumped warbler.

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One member of a flock of goldfinches.

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A lone western grebe was off the fishing pier.

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A squadron of surf scoters was floating near the ferry dock. The winter visitors are beginning to arrive.

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Bill Anderson

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Monday's birding (10-8-18) started in my backyard with a red-breasted sapsucker, a first for my backyard. It poked around the seed feeder while looking longingly at the suet feeder, which was occupied by a flicker.

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It flew over to the suet feeder after the flicker left.

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A wet marsh was in the foliage under the #3 viewing platform at the marsh.

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This heron looked rather gloomy at the marina.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
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Birds at the marsh Friday afternoon (10-12-18).

A few yellow-rumped warblers will spend winter at the marsh. They are easily recognizable by their distinctive yellow "bibs" and signature yellow rumps.

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A great blue heron took off toward the marina.

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Black-eyed juncos are here year round and frequent diners at my home feeders.

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Wesley or his successor was hunting bugs in the fir trees near the #1 viewing platform.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
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Wesley continued snacking on bugs Saturday afternoon (10-13-18). Hummers get much protein from eating small insects.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
This year herons began perching in the trees that line the walkway between the #2 and #3 viewing platforms. With the leaves starting to fall, they are now visible from the boardwalk.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
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A local birder spotted a northern shrike while I was at the marsh Sunday afternoon (10-14-18). I wonder if it was the same bird that was seen a week ago.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
It coughed up a pellet while perched on the old martin gourd holder. While behavior is usually associated with owls, it is common to all birds of prey. Sorry for the poor shots. I was too lazy to drag out the 500L telephoto and tripod and I should have been shooting these using negative exposure compensation due to the low sun.

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A small flock of shorebirds flew up from the south side of the marsh and headed north. I thought they were all killdeer and focused on the lead bird. After viewing my photos on the computer, I discovered that at least one of the birds was a different species.

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Guesses as to its ID are welcome.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Monday afternoon (10-15-18) a birder/photographer friend found a pair of black turnstones foraging along the marina breakwater off the fishing pier.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Some speculated that Sunday's mystery sandpiper might be a pectoral sandpiper. Tuesday (10-16-18) two of us found a sandpiper at the marsh that might be a pectoral. Unfortunately for photographers, our California summer has transitioned into an Indian summer with bright, sunny days continuing to make photography at the marsh difficult.

From the #2 (main) viewing platform.

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From the walkway between the #2 and #3 viewing platforms. A pair of western (?) sandpipers among the killdeer.

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Photography from the #3 viewing platform by the outdoor tennis courts was a little easier.

Pectoral (?) sandpiper.

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Western sandpiper.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
A local birder spotted the northern shrike on a tree bordering Willow Creek late Sunday afternoon (10-21-18) shortly before sunset. I am assuming it is the same bird I photographed a week ago as I do not see shrikes at the marsh with any degree of regularity.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Some shots from Monday (10-22-18).

The pair of spotted towhees continues to hang out in the vicinity of the #2 viewing platform at the marsh.

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As does Wesley or his successor.

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The crows helped me locate one of the resident barred owls of Pine Ridge Park.

Yawn for the camera.

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